Elvis Presley

BONUS ELVIS PRESLEY CHALLENGE

DONALD TRUMP

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There is doubt in Europe. The paranoid reckon a Fascist demagogue will soon be in the White House and that this is a new dark day for Western Civilisation. The more measured believe Trump is no more than a motor mouth salesman who is obliged to overcommit on delivery to unrealistic customers.  And all of us are remembering that the American people have form. In the Promised Land they elect movie actors and body-builders to high office. Introspection follows rage, and we are obliged to think of our own absurdities Boris Johnson and Silvio Berlusconi. But the peoples of Europe do not only think. We can also be emotional.

Some years ago I had lunch in London with a literary agent. He was from Boston.   In the conversation it became clear that he had less regard and respect for the American South than me. Years later I watched an episode of The Sopranos and heard Tony the head honcho dismiss the American South as Elvis Country. At that moment I remembered that refined lunch in London.   I am from the North of England and curious about the Deep South to the extent of even being loyal to its people. I am aware of its faults and of the history of racism but I also value its culture, black and white. Music plays a part but there is also literature, writers like William Faulkner, Erskine Caldwell and Eudora Welty.   The Deep South has and had racist divisions but within those divisions there appeared to exist communities that allowed the ordinary to share mutual respect.   So it seemed. When I was young, I imagined an oppressed people who had dignity. Neither was I repelled by the story of bank robber Dillinger and the support he received from ordinary folk. The loyalty shown to the bank robber by outsiders was impressive, and I admired the defiance of those who understood their paltry inheritance in a loaded economic system. No doubt I was a confused young man. More important than my romantic invention was the Southern music that helped me fill a life. The music of the American South had heart and was free of pretension but it also existed as evidence of working class worth. The South had its bigots but nobody could deny the potency of blues, country, gospel, soul music and rock and roll.

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Much has been said about soft power being important to American dominance in the world. Hollywood was important but there were also all the ordinary working class Southerners who picked up a guitar and had decent tonsils.   People will argue about the respective merits of the individual musicians but nobody can deny the importance of Elvis Presley to the soft power of the USA. And, when he wilted, there were other American musicians who inspired Europeans. No doubt there are people in Boston and New Jersey who listen to Elvis and music from the American South but to them Elvis will promise less than he did to his British fans. There existed enough of those fans to let him change how we related to our own history. The British became curious about the man and his homeland and wanted to understand what had made possible something as exciting and confident as rock and roll and rhythm and blues. And, although some of us were shocked by the racism and lynching of the Deep South and never really cared for the excess patriotism , we also responded to Lucas Beauchamp the proud and independent black man in Intruder In The Dust, the patient tolerance and humanity in To Kill A Mockingbird and the responsible sympathy for the oppressed and vulnerable that was evident in The Night Of The Hunter.

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So today there are people in Britain who are disappointed by the American Presidential Election. And perhaps we have no right because, of course, we are also flawed. We must not forget Boris the piffled buffoon. But the Brits who have large record collections or used to work in record stores devoted to American music have heavier hearts than they did at the beginning of the week. There is a view that the world has become a more frightening place since Trump but I am not so sure. The world was frightening anyway. Whatever he does will consist of no more than making a bad situation worse because it has been bad and getting worse since Thatcher and Reagan.

I understand that the victory of Trump required more than the votes of the white working class in the South. Well before Trump, the selfish and not very bright rich proved they were without standards. His election tells us nothing new about the powerful and the affluent. But forget them for a moment, Elvis Country was solidly behind Trump, and that is what will disappoint those Europeans who spent a large part of their lives in record stores. The resentment and difficult circumstances of working class Americans are recognised.  The same justified misgivings about the future of ordinary working people exist in Europe. Yet the same people who feel let down by the American economy were the ones who ushered in Reagan, neoliberalism, restrictions on trade unions and tax cuts for the rich. All of it made the ordinary people of America poorer, and guess what? Those who are suffering from the medicine want more spoonfuls.

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Trump claims that he will create jobs and pay decent wages, which I hope is the main reason working class Americans voted for him, but anyone who can do a simple jigsaw should realise he is an unlikely saviour. In his acceptance speech Trump promised that his great economic plan would double growth. This is economic illiteracy. Does he mean he intends to double the annual rate of growth or that in a thousand years the rate of growth in the USA will have doubled? To be credible the sentence needed more and somewhat obvious words. What is certain is that the rich will pay less tax because they will utilise his advocated low rates of corporation tax to avoid paying income tax. Investment will reduce because excess profits will be taken out of businesses. Because money spent on research and development is tax free, higher corporation tax encourages investment and expansion yet without it Trump will somehow double output and create jobs.   Well, best of luck. And anyone who can build a wall across the breadth of America without immigrant labour is a better man than me.

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For all the mistakes of the past and the blemishes in European politics the truth is that Trump is a blot on a country whose ordinary people redefined the culture of the rest of the world.  The decline of Elvis that tarnished his career haunts those Brits who used the same record stores as me.  And they and me are disturbed by the success of Trump. Millions of Americans have voted for an inarticulate ill-mannered 70 year old who dies his hair blonde, has such compassion for his countrymen and women that he pays no taxes on his fortune, admits that he introduces himself to women with a grope, and who is married to a walk around mannequin who looks like she should be his granddaughter. Elvis continued to wear his white jump suit after he had put on weight, and after that he was identified with tack. Trump is like the white suits. He is embarrassing and has brought undiscovered tack to American politics. His appearance and personality will ensure for the fortunate that his reign has comic appeal. The not so lucky may struggle to maintain a sense of humour. They need a sense of irony at least because many of them have decided they can endure an even more lopsided economy. Those Britons who used to fill independent record stores will also be gloomy. No doubt the music and literature will turn us around so that we can be positive again about a unique culture that helped us become adults. We will make excuses for ignorance, as we have done in the past. At that point someone will say there is a reason for working class anger in the American South and that when Elvis visited Nixon perhaps he had a point about the Beatles being smug know-alls. But even then we will be mystified as to how and why Elvis and the ordinary people of the United States ever thought that Nixon and Trump were on the same side as them.

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Howard Jackson has had five books published by Red Rattle Books. His latest book Choke Bay is now available here. If you are interested in original horror and crime fiction and want information about the other books of Howard Jackson and other great titles, click here.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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An A-Z Journey Around Britain

48 Widnes

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Paul Simon wrote Homeward Bound while waiting to catch a train out of Widnes. The homesick singer did not settle in Britain, unlike the daughter of Elvis Presley who moved to Tunbridge Welles and who has sometimes sold fish and chips from the back of a van. She must think it quaint. Tunbridge Wells, though, is not Widnes. Runcorn is on the south bank where the Mersey estuary widens, and Widnes is on the north bank. The suspension bridge that crosses the estuary is magnificent but it is plagued by traffic in the rush hours.

Widnes expanded after a chemical factory was established there in 1845. Chemical manufacturing still provides employment for the locals. Social deprivation in Widnes is not exceptional but despite investment the town feels a poor choice for a place to live a life. Neither quite the outskirts of Liverpool nor an independent town, it has even swapped counties and now is condemned to being unwanted by not just Liverpool but Lancashire, where it used to be, and Cheshire, where it is now.

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In the index to British listed buildings the interior of the town hall is described as ‘without interest’. The exterior, though, is a heart warming mix of red brick and tile and is packed with industrial gothic integrity.   If the town is ordinary, Victoria Park is well maintained and it complements fresh air rather well. Spike Island has wildlife, a riverside walk and a nearby power station. It is a good place for a pedestrian to see the Runcorn-Widnes Bridge.  Catalyst is a good name for a science museum that has won awards. The ticket prices reflect a desire to educate rather than make money.

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The true passion in Widnes is Rugby League. Widnes Vikings are not rivals for the Lancashire giants, St Helens and Wigan, but they have a good stadium, and the team has had its moments, including being Rugby League World Champions in 1989. Widnes also has a Silver Blades Ice Rink and a two year old ice hockey team that has begun well.

The Brindley Theatre, which is in Runcorn, attracts customers from both sides of the estuary. It relies on tribute bands rather than fading talent, unlike the seaside theatres in the South. There are exceptions. Michael Portillo appears in February, and the talented actor Simon Callow in March. Callow will be talking about his hero and mine, Orson Welles. The ex-Tory Minister will be exploiting his enthusiasm for railways and trying to sell a book. The restaurants and pubs in Widnes and Runcorn are not memorable but the reviews for La Cantina in Trip Advisor are exceptionally good.

The name Widnes is derived from Vid Nase, which is supposed to be a Viking reference to the wide nose of the estuary.

On my last visit to Widnes I saw the Ronettes. Ronnie Spector had aged but her flirtation from the stage produced an uninhibited reaction in the men that would have shamed any redneck audience. Confident American women should be wary of the signals they give to men in small Northern towns. After that night Ronnie Spector understood. I saw a confident rock star retreat into an asexual shell. Like Paul Simon, the leader of the Ronettes did not return to Widnes.

Next week, arcades and motorcars, Wigan

Howard Jackson has had four books published by Red Rattle Books. His 11,000 mile journey around Brazil is described in Innocent Mosquitoes. His latest book and compilation of horror stories is called Nightmares Ahead. Published by Red Rattle Books and praised by critics, it is available here.

If you want to read more about his travels click here.